Abstract

Through an exploration of the Jamesian grammar of furniture and how it reflects on the characteristic features of James's late texts, this article problematizes the reading of James that posits a chronologically progressive dematerialization in his aesthetic practice. The "details" of the Jamesian world symptomatize an increasing, and increasingly specific, imbrication of subject and object, idea and thing, in James's late-nineteenth-century apotheosis of realist representation.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1080-6555
Print ISSN
0273-0340
Pages
pp. 115-126
Launched on MUSE
2004-05-04
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.