Abstract

Drawing on insights from a dual-process model of culture, social networks, and behavior, this study develops a model that specifies the associations among religiousness and marijuana use during adolescence and young adulthood. In particular, the model highlights potential reciprocal associations among religiousness, marijuana use, drug-using peer networks, religious peer networks, and moral schemas. Analyses of longitudinal data from the National Survey of Youth and Religion (NSYR; n = 2,276) provide some support for the model. In particular, religious and drug-using peer networks play a key role in understanding how marijuana use and religiousness are mutually related during adolescence and young adulthood.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1534-7605
Print ISSN
0037-7732
Pages
pp. 181-208
Launched on MUSE
2014-09-16
Open Access
No
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