Abstract

Researchers across disciplines have struggled to understand the entanglement of human-environment relationships. Nowhere are these entanglements more evident than among human communities situated within protected areas. These communities often rely on natural resources, such as wildlife, as an integral component of daily livelihoods. The success of human livelihood strategies and the continued presence of wildlife hinges upon our ability to understand inherently dependent relationships between animals and humans. Using the bushmeat trade as an entry point, this article draws on theoretical developments in anthropology, specifically mutual ecologies and data-based approaches to wildlife management, to examine relationships between hunters and hunted in the Dzanga-Sangha Dense Forest Reserve (APDS).

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Additional Information

ISSN
1534-1518
Print ISSN
0003-5491
Pages
pp. 613-633
Launched on MUSE
2014-09-07
Open Access
No
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