Abstract

This article argues that texts by Edmund Spenser imagine an idealized English voice in opposition both to Irish noise and, surprisingly, to Spenser’s own poetry. I begin with a close reading of a scene from The Faerie Queene in which a woman is about to be sacrificed by a group of noisy cannibals, the portrayal of whom recalls many contemporary English accounts of alleged Irish barbarity. I continue by examining the Irish war-cry (known as the “Hubbub”) as Spenser discusses it in A Vewe of the Present State of Irelande and as it appears in the epic. I conclude by exploring some of the anxieties that attend the echoing voices in “Epithalamion.”

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1080-6547
Print ISSN
0013-8304
Pages
pp. 757-786
Launched on MUSE
2014-09-03
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.