Abstract

In this essay I examine the presence of sound as a means of expanding the literary and political dimensions of James Baldwin’s 1972 text, No Name in the Street. I argue that Baldwin extends his ideas of blues aesthetics as a window into black political consciousness, and that he more broadly attends to the acoustic qualities of his prose in an effort to critically diagnose a darkening post-civil rights reality marking the late 1960s and early ’70s.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1945-6182
Print ISSN
1062-4783
Pages
pp. 587-604
Launched on MUSE
2014-09-03
Open Access
No
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