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  • Contributors

michael epp is Associate Professor of English Literature and Public Texts at Trent University. In addition to publishing numerous articles on durability and violence in U.S. literature and culture, he has written on nineteenth-century American quality magazine advertising, editing, and humor. michaelepp@trentu.ca

emma hart is Lecturer in Early Modern History at the University of St. Andrews, Scotland. She is the author of Building Charleston: Town and Society in the Eighteenth-Century British Atlantic World (University of Virginia Press, 2010) and a number of other articles on the early American city. Her current research centers on the history of the market place in the British Atlantic world before 1783. efh2@st-andrews.ac.uk

carl robert keyes is Assistant Professor of History at Assumption College in Worcester, Massachusetts. He is currently revising a book manuscript, Early American Advertising: Marketing and Consumer Culture in Eighteenth-Century America. He is also the author of “A Revolution in Advertising: ‘Buy American’ Campaigns in the Late Eighteenth Century” in We Are What We Sell: How Advertising Shapes American Life . . . And Always Has (Praeger, 2014). ckeyes@assumption.edu

seth perry is Assistant Professor of Religion in the Americas at Princeton University. He has received fellowships from the McNeil Center for Early American Studies and the American Antiquarian Society, and his work has appeared in the edited collection Gods of the River: Religion and Culture along the Mississippi (Indiana University Press, 2013), as well as in The Chronicle Review, Sightings, and Religion Dispatches. He is a regular contributor to earlyamericanists.com. perry.seth@gmail.com [End Page 217]

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Additional Information

ISSN
1548-4238
Print ISSN
1054-7479
Pages
p. 217
Launched on MUSE
2014-09-03
Open Access
No
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