Abstract

I examine genealogical metaphors and related causal statements in the plays of Aeschylus, particularly the Oresteia, and demonstrate how, when taken together, they present a systematic view of ethical behavior and its consequences, necessary for a comprehensive understanding of Aeschylean thought. While Aeschylus' perspective falls firmly within the Solonian tradition of koroshybris-atê, he adds piety—mortals' recognition of their common subordination to the divine, which encourages them to respect the human status of others—as an essential element for human behavior. Piety is an essential prerequisite for justness, particularly important for Aeschylus because of his identification of Zeus with justice.

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Additional Information

ISSN
2575-7199
Print ISSN
2575-7180
Pages
pp. 23-54
Launched on MUSE
2004-04-23
Open Access
No
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