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THE FRENCH PRESS AND WAR AIMS F. H. D. P'CKERSOILL BRIEFLY, French opinion on the subject of war aims can be divided. into three simple categories, all three of which stand together on one point, that "we must put an end to H itJerism." The differences appear after one has assumed the victory of the Allies and the end of Naziism. On the one hand, there is the group, represented most 'clearly and intelligently by the Action Franfaist, Royalist daily, which maintains the absolute necessity of totally destroying the German state, of cutting it up again into small principalities easily dominated individually by France and Britain, and the creation of a Central Eut9pean federation of Austria, Hungary, "Bohemia," and Poland under a Hapsburg monarch, a state which would be heavily financed by France and England as a bastion of defence against Russia and Asia. Several newspapers of the Right, such as L. 'Jour, Le Matin, Exul,ior, Gringoire, Candide, .and 'Je Suis Partout, tend with greater .or less intensity in the same direction. At the other ex. treme, the Socialist Populair., the Radical-Socialist CEuvre, the Catholic Aube; and weeklies such as La Lumi~., Le Pel/pIe, and Temps Present, all either Left-wing or Catholic, abstain rigorously from any sort of anti.Ger,man propaganda, maintain a distinction between Naziism and the German people, and insist on the latter's right to live, regard the gratuitous creation of a Hapsburg federation in Cel)tral Europe as reactionary, a step back to tyrannical power.. politics, and look to the immediate creation of a strengthened League of Nations after ┬Ěthe war, and in the long run to the dissolutioll of European nations in a United States of Europe. Between these two positions is to be found the third: the most violently nationalistic of the three. Nationalist and anti-German, but not Catonic in an insistence on Germania deienda est, this group , c.onsiders the principle of sovereign nationalities as the necessary starting point for the reconstruction of Europe. It recognizes the right to exist, not .only of the Czech, Polish, and Austrian states, ' but.also orthe German state, though of a disarmed, surveyed, and , (tor a time) militarily occupied German state. Politically it is neither particularly to the Left nor particularly to the Right: it is represented by Ord", whose editor is the syndicalist Bure, by Justice with its ex-communist editor Frossard, by Epoqu~) the news262 THE FRENCH PRESS AND WAR AIMS F. H. D. P'CKERSOILL BRIEFLY, French opinion on the subject of war aims can be divided. into three simple categories, all three of which stand together on one point, that "we must put an end to H itJerism." The differences appear after one has assumed the victory of the Allies and the end of Naziism. On the one hand, there is the group, represented most 'clearly and intelligently by the Action Franfaist, Royalist daily, which maintains the absolute necessity of totally destroying the German state, of cutting it up again into small principalities easily dominated individually by France and Britain, and the creation of a Central Eut9pean federation of Austria, Hungary, "Bohemia," and Poland under a Hapsburg monarch, a state which would be heavily financed by France and England as a bastion of defence against Russia and Asia. Several newspapers of the Right, such as L. 'Jour, Le Matin, Exul,ior, Gringoire, Candide, .and 'Je Suis Partout, tend with greater .or less intensity in the same direction. At the other ex. treme, the Socialist Populair., the Radical-Socialist CEuvre, the Catholic Aube; and weeklies such as La Lumi~., Le Pel/pIe, and Temps Present, all either Left-wing or Catholic, abstain rigorously from any sort of anti.Ger,man propaganda, maintain a distinction between Naziism and the German people, and insist on the latter's right to live, regard the gratuitous creation of a Hapsburg federation in Cel)tral Europe as reactionary, a step back to tyrannical power.. politics, and look to the immediate creation of a strengthened League of Nations after ┬Ěthe war, and in the long run to the dissolutioll of European nations in a United States of Europe. Between these two positions is...

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Additional Information

ISSN
1712-5278
Print ISSN
0042-0247
Pages
pp. 262-269
Launched on MUSE
2015-07-01
Open Access
No
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