In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:

DEMOCRACY TODAY* A. D. UNDSA Y THIS is a remarkable book, written by a remarkable man. It is not an academic treatise, but a profession of faith, a diagnosis of what has gone wrong with democracy since the war, and a rallying call for the future. Anyone who reviews it must begin with a tribute to the spirit in which it is written. The ex-President of Czecho-Slovakia might well be bitter, cynical, and disillusioned. He is none of these things-rather One who never turned his back ·but marched breast forward, Never doubted clouds wouJd break, Never dreamed, though right were worsted, wrong would triumph, Held we faU to rise, are baffled to light better, Sleep to wake. The last sentences of the book are: "The present crisis in Europe is the continuation of the fight for abetter society. That is the ideal of democracy. This ideal is something so high, so valuable, and so dignified that it is worth believing and living. It is worth being a democrat." There is an assurance in the book, a sanity and magnanimity and courage that make ita tomc. Dr BeneS sees democracy as "a benefit always in danger and always to be defended, cultivated, guarded and improved." "The Declaration oj Human Rights of the French and American revolutions was a political and philosophical act, in which the intellectual and political efforts of five centuries (or even, one could say, the struggle for the political development and organisation of society in all ages) was concentrated. It was the trIUmph of reason and the freedom of conscience, science and research, the triumph of rationalism as a philosophical method and system against the old mediaeval scho,lastic philosophy, Catholic theology and religious intolerance." But this nineteenth-century democracy had not done its full work. It had not solved the social question. "The question of how to transform the political liberal democracy into a new kind of *Democracy Today and Tomorrow, by Edward Bend, ex-President of CzechoSlovakia , Macmillan, 1939, $3.00. 253 DEMOCRACY TODAY* A. D. UNDSA Y THIS is a remarkable book, written by a remarkable man. It is not an academic treatise, but a profession of faith, a diagnosis of what has gone wrong with democracy since the war, and a rallying call for the future. Anyone who reviews it must begin with a tribute to the spirit in which it is written. The ex-President of Czecho-Slovakia might well be bitter, cynical, and disillusioned. He is none of these things-rather One who never turned his back ·but marched breast forward, Never doubted clouds wouJd break, Never dreamed, though right were worsted, wrong would triumph, Held we faU to rise, are baffled to light better, Sleep to wake. The last sentences of the book are: "The present crisis in Europe is the continuation of the fight for abetter society. That is the ideal of democracy. This ideal is something so high, so valuable, and so dignified that it is worth believing and living. It is worth being a democrat." There is an assurance in the book, a sanity and magnanimity and courage that make ita tomc. Dr BeneS sees democracy as "a benefit always in danger and always to be defended, cultivated, guarded and improved." "The Declaration oj Human Rights of the French and American revolutions was a political and philosophical act, in which the intellectual and political efforts of five centuries (or even, one could say, the struggle for the political development and organisation of society in all ages) was concentrated. It was the trIUmph of reason and the freedom of conscience, science and research, the triumph of rationalism as a philosophical method and system against the old mediaeval scho,lastic philosophy, Catholic theology and religious intolerance." But this nineteenth-century democracy had not done its full work. It had not solved the social question. "The question of how to transform the political liberal democracy into a new kind of *Democracy Today and Tomorrow, by Edward Bend, ex-President of CzechoSlovakia , Macmillan, 1939, $3.00. 253 254 THE UNIVERSITY.OF TORONTO QUARTERLY social and economic democracy arose." "The bourgeois postwar European society is just now waging a new...

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1712-5278
Print ISSN
0042-0247
Pages
pp. 253-261
Launched on MUSE
2015-07-01
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.