Abstract

With a focus on urban space and social and cultural interactions, this article argues that the Louvre, as both a physical and political site, articulates a rather ambiguous connection between art, culture, and politics in the seventeenth century. If the Louvre represents royal authority, it is no longer the place in which new culture circulates. By bringing together perspectives from art, literature, as well as urban and cultural studies, this article aims to question the relation between space and culture and to understand how the Louvre positions itself within a new kind of urban experience.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1931-0234
Print ISSN
0014-0767
Pages
pp. 45-62
Launched on MUSE
2014-10-23
Open Access
No
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