Abstract

Examining the initial construction of the Louvre as part of Philip Augustus’ program of fortifications in the late twelfth and early thirteenth century, this article examines texts depicting towers defending waterways and their possible influence on the architectural imaginary. The ninth-century monk Abbo’s Latin poem about Norse raids on Paris in 885-886 conveyed the importance of elevation and solid stone construction for defensive towers, and the need to protect the Seine from the northern threats. Twelfth-century romances such as the Roman d’Enéas and Partonopeus de Blois describe impressive towers ten times taller than the Louvre’s citadel, but whose proportions were strikingly similar.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1931-0234
Print ISSN
0014-0767
Pages
pp. 3-18
Launched on MUSE
2014-10-23
Open Access
No
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