Abstract

Elections in postconflict countries are commonly seen as evidence that hostilities have come to an end and a new era of peace, reconciliation, and development will begin; however, the reality may be quite different, particularly when setbacks include lingering antagonism and ongoing division between opposing groups or former parties to the conflict. With a focus on the 2011 elections in postconflict Liberia, this article presents some of the central historical background to be considered, the dilemmas to be resolved, and obstacles to be overcome if not only democratic elections, but also a democratic society, is to emerge there.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1527-1978
Print ISSN
0001-9887
Pages
pp. 47-65
Launched on MUSE
2014-06-27
Open Access
No
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