Abstract

The school story has a long tradition in children's literature. Orson Scott Card dramatically revises and rewrites the tradition in two "school stories in space," Ender's Game and Ender's Shadow. Doyle and Stewart find that Card's innovations in the school story form and his departures from conventional narrative structures are inextricably linked to the need to escape narrowly defined perceptions about narrative, about education, and about the relationships between adults and children. Ultimately and essentially, the novels reconsider what it means to be human, with its attending successes and failures, in a postmodern world.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1080-6563
Print ISSN
0147-2593
Pages
pp. 186-202
Launched on MUSE
2004-04-12
Open Access
No
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