Abstract

Roughly 150 years before the Oxford English Dictionary acknowledged that “fairy” can signify “nonheterosexual,” Horace Walpole (1717–1797) wrote the rollicking story “A Fairy Tale,” in which the eponymous fairy is the bisexual and flamboyantly gender-ambivalent Baron John Hervey. The tale is important because it represents the satirical, adult British fairy tradition that grew up in answer to the more widely published French fairy-tale tradition and because it provides scholars with a fresh frame of reference for investigating queer “fairy” language in eighteenth- and early-nineteenth-century texts.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1536-1802
Print ISSN
1521-4281
Pages
pp. 167-179
Launched on MUSE
2014-05-29
Open Access
No
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