Abstract

Using the 2009 California Health Interview Survey, this study examined ethnic variation in the predictors of having a usual source of health care among Asian Americans who are non-U.S. citizens. Chinese residents reported the highest probability of having a usual source of health care (78.0%), followed by Vietnamese (59.8%) and Korean residents (45.2%), and the differences were statistically significant (χ2 = 11.65, p < .01). Poverty status was the only significant predictor for Korean residents and insurance status was the only significant predictor for Vietnamese residents. By contrast, both poverty and insurance status predicted which Chinese residents had a usual source of care. To enhance health care access for vulnerable subgroups of non-U.S. citizens, health care professionals must be aware that there are cultural differences in the predictors of having a usual source of health care based on whether one is an immigrant from China, Korea, or Vietnam.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1548-6869
Print ISSN
1049-2089
Pages
pp. 577-590
Launched on MUSE
2014-05-19
Open Access
No
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