Abstract

When James Joyce went to Paris as a young man in 1902, he followed a narrative arc fundamental to the European Bildungsromane. Comparing Joyce’s motives and decisions with those of his fictional predecessors in novels by Stendhal, Honoré de Balzac, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, and others, I argue that he acted at first as an unwitting and unreconstructed hero of the genre but that, as he wrote the last two stories for Dubliners in 1906-1907, he earned greater perspective over his life and writing. Little Chandler, Gallaher, and Gabriel Conroy proved to be especially important catalysts for a Joyce in evolution from hero to author of his own Bildungsroman.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1938-6036
Print ISSN
0021-4183
Pages
pp. 527-555
Launched on MUSE
2014-05-17
Open Access
No
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