Abstract

The traditional scholarship on the history of the civil-military relations in the Weimar Republic emphasizes the military establishment’s hostility toward the civilian leadership, based on the former’s lack of democratic principles. Yet a closer look at the military’s own publications in the latter years of the republic reveals a deeper sense of insecurity and alienation emerging from the experience of the World War I and the Versailles process, which helped shape the contours of military culture at the turn of the 1930s.

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Additional Information

ISSN
2164-8646
Print ISSN
0149-7952
Pages
pp. 19-39
Launched on MUSE
2014-04-02
Open Access
No
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