Abstract

This paper investigates the impact of religiosity on agricultural investment in the Great Plains region of the United States at the turn of the twentieth century. We find that counties with higher concentrations of religious adherents tend to experience greater growth in land improvements on farms. In addition, we find that increases in religious diversity leads to growth in land improvement investments. Overall, the results generally support hypotheses that assert social capital, as measured by religious group concentrations, played a significant, and until recently, overlooked, role in the development of the American agricultural economy.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
2334-2463
Print ISSN
1052-5165
Pages
pp. 37-46
Launched on MUSE
2014-03-31
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.