Abstract

This article deals with the emotional implications of children’s obedience, particularly in the context of significant reconsiderations of obedience in the United States from the early nineteenth century onward. Using newly-usable quantitative as well as qualitative information, the article assesses efforts to change the emotional valence of obedience, particularly by adding unprecedented emphasis on cheerful obedience (with a concomitant concern about sulkiness), and the reasons for this change. This interesting transition presaged a fuller decline of interest in obedience in favor of other childhood emotional qualities.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1527-1897
Print ISSN
0022-4529
Pages
pp. 593-611
Launched on MUSE
2014-03-12
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.