Abstract

The failure of the U.S. Catholic Church’s mission to Liberia in the mid-nineteenth century represented the Church’s inability to practice its idealistic teaching concerning slavery and manumission, as well as to cope with the situation of free persons of color in a culture where race and ethnicity were of the greatest significance. The mission’s lack of success can be attributed to a dearth of ecclesiastical personnel equipped to work among Americans or Africans; a predominantly Protestant environment hostile to the Catholic Church; large-scale immigration from Europe; and cultural differences between European churchmen and their American and African flocks.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1534-0708
Print ISSN
0008-8080
Pages
pp. 27-51
Launched on MUSE
2014-03-02
Open Access
No
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