Abstract

Catullus’ Attis is known as a figure of devotion and delusion, a zealot who castrates himself as an offering to Cybele, regrets his actions too late, and is condemned to lifelong exile and servitude. This paper argues that traditional oral-epic thematic and phraseological design in 63 provides an epic-like setting for a poem about a eunuch that begins in the realm of myth, where Attis is portrayed as an eccentric, though benign, convert to foreign religious practice. But midway through the poem, Catullus shifts our focus to a Greco-Roman realism from which Attis can be viewed simultaneously as a madman and an object of pity.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
2160-5157
Print ISSN
1040-3612
Pages
pp. 155-180
Launched on MUSE
2015-04-01
Open Access
No
Archive Status
Archived 2021
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.