Abstract

Thucydides’ Mytilenean debate has often been read as a study in opposites, and one of the standard oppositions seen in it is that between reason and passion. This article seeks to show that Cleon’s and Diodotus’ speeches are more similar than different, and that both contain implicit emotional appeals cloaked in the guise of reason. Both men presume that a certain kind of emotional education is necessary to the functioning of democracy, and both attempt to provide it. Aristotle’s Rhetoric provides a key to looking at reason and passion not as polar opposites but as two integral parts of decision-making.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
2160-5157
Print ISSN
1040-3612
Pages
pp. 115-154
Launched on MUSE
2015-04-01
Open Access
No
Archive Status
Archived 2021
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.