Abstract

Since Pieter Kool’s dissertation on police in Greco-Roman Egypt, scholars have subscribed to the view that police administration was uniform across the kingdom and that police chiefs (archiphylakitai) in villages were connected to nome-level chiefs by a lengthy chain of command. This paper argues that neither was the case: that administrative structures varied from nome to nome, and that the hierarchy of archiphylakitai was flat. Chiefs answered to civil, financial, and other police officials, not to higher archiphylakitai. The “hierarchy” of police chiefs, unlike similar hierarchies in other spheres of government, was easily accessible, surprisingly flexible, and efficient.

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Additional Information

ISSN
2160-5157
Print ISSN
1040-3612
Pages
pp. 181-211
Launched on MUSE
2015-04-01
Open Access
No
Archive Status
Archived 2021
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