Abstract

This article investigates the scene of writing and fundraising that was supported by the Jewish Consumptives' Relief Society (JCRS), a sanatorium founded in Denver, Colorado for indigent Jews suffering from tuberculosis. This case study investigates the coarticulation of a medical institution and the history of Yiddish literary production and translation in America, with a specific interest in the career and medical history of the Yiddish poet known as Yehoash. Drawing on the methodological interventions of Bruno Latour and Pierre Bourdieu, I argue that there emerges a traceable, literary-philanthropic network that runs to and through the JCRS, imbricating institution and writer in an exchange of what I call "tubercular capital."

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Additional Information

ISSN
1080-6571
Print ISSN
0278-9671
Pages
pp. 303-329
Launched on MUSE
2014-01-28
Open Access
No
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