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B o o k R e v i e w s From the Special Issue Book Review Editor . . . Jenny Emery Davidson 264 William Kittredge, The Nature of Generosity......................................................Paul Crumbley 265 Linda Hogan, The Woman Who Watches over the World: A Native M em oir............................................ Stephen Tatum 267 Gregory Martin, Mountain C ity.......................................... Frank Bergon 269 Mark Spragg, Where Rivers Change Direction................Melody Graulich 270 Terry Tempest Williams, Leap....................................Judy Nolte Temple 272 Julene Bair, One Degree West: Reflections of a Plainsdaughter.............................Susan Naramore Maher 273 Carter Revard, Winning the Dust Bow l............................. Ellen L. Arnold 275 Alvin M. Josephy Jr., A Walk toward Oregon: A Memoir............................... James H. Maguire 276 Teri Hein, Atomic Farmgirl: The Betrayal of Chief Qualchan, the Appaloosa, and M e ............................. Susan Kollin 277 Kim Barnes, Hungry for the World: A M emoir..................Brenda Miller 279 W. Scott Olsen, Dawn Marano, Douglas Carlson, and Wendy Bishop, When We Say We’re Home: A Quartet of Place and Memory...........................................Jennifer Sinor 280 Robert S. McPherson, ed., The journey of Navajo Oshley: An Autobiography and Life History...........................................Alan Barlow 281 Judy Blunt, Breaking C lean .................................................Doug Werden 283 E r r o r C o r r e c t i o n : In the Winter 2002 issue, we neglected to give proper credit to the Experience Hendrix for letting us reprint lyrics by Jimi Hendrix. The credit line to the first epigraph in Todd F. Tietchen’s essay “Cowboy Tricksters and Devilish Wangols: Ishmael Reed’s HooDoo West” should have read —Jimi Hendrix, “Voodoo Child (Slight Return)” Copyright Experience Hendrix, L.L.C. Used by permission/all rights reserved. We apologize for the oversight. O f % j w r . Kerry James Marshall. A PORTRAIT OF THE ARTIST AS A SHADOW OF HIS FORMER SELF. 1980. Egg tempera on paper. 8" x 6 1/2". Collection of Steven and Deborah Lebowitz, Pacific Palisades. With permission of the artist. ^ A Portrait of the Artist as a Shadow of His Former Self is the first in a series of paintings where Marshall considers the idea of making invisibility visual. Inspired by Ralph Ellison and responding to images like Sambo and “jokes about people being so dark you can’t see them at night unless they’re smiling,” he sought “a way to reclaim that image of blackness so that it wasn’t negatively valued, but achieved an undeniable majesty.” “The problem,” he writes, “was how to bring that figure close to being a stereotypical representation without collapsing completely into stereotype. I was playing at the boundary between a completely flattened'Out stereotype, a cartoon, and a fully resonant, complicated, authentic representation, a black archetype . . . [which] allows for degrees of complexity” (KerryJames Marshall 117). Ishmael Reed often plays with that same boundary. C o w b o y T r ic k s t e r s a n d D e v il is h W a n g o l s : Is h m a e l R e e d ’s H o o D o o W e s t T o d d F. T ie t c h e n Well, I stand up next to a mountain And I chop it down with the edge of my hand Well, I pick up all the pieces and make an island Might even raise a little sand ’Cause I’m a Voodoo child Lord knows I’m a Voodoo child. — Jimi Hendrix, “Voodoo Child (Slight Return)” WTaen he saw the Loop standing over him, Rev. Boyd brought forth his crucifix. Nothing happened. . . . Loop lashed the crucifix from his breast without tearing into the man’s flesh. The crucifix dropped to the floor and the little figure attached to it scrambled into the nearest mouse hole. — Ishmael Reed, Yellow Back Radio Broke-Down While postcolonial theory has done much to assert the sanctity of indigenous religions, Voodoo is still popularly understood as an “evil” form of worship. According to Ishmael Reed, the plight of Voodoo— or Vodoun— epitomizes colonial intolerance of difference; because Vodoun is a neo-African religion, it has been vilified as an essentially uncivilized religious practice at odds with Western Christianity. As Reed explains...

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Additional Information

ISSN
1948-7142
Print ISSN
0043-3462
Pages
pp. 325-342
Launched on MUSE
2017-10-04
Open Access
No
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