Abstract

In this article, the character of Jack Cade in Shakespeare's 2 Henry VI is reconsidered through an exploration of the local history and traditions of Kent. The article shows that Shakespeare, through Cade and his followers, created a sense of local historical consciousness that directly challenges the structures of chronicle history and manifests itself in various acts of self-affirmation. In particular, Shakespeare departed from his sources by giving Cade a Kentish identity. Furthermore, the article offers a challenge to the modern critical consensus that Shakespeare made Cade more violent than he was in the play's chronicle sources.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1553-3786
Print ISSN
1531-0485
Pages
pp. 63-87
Launched on MUSE
2013-12-19
Open Access
No
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