Abstract

This article examines forms of knowledge and medical practice in three generations of Bon medical practitioners in Tibet. A key component of the discussion is the way in which Tibetan medicine, and particularly the two principal texts of the Bon and Buddhist medical tradition, serves as a symbolic marker of social and cultural identity. Based on ethnographic data collected in the Ngari, Kham, and Amdo regions of Tibet, the author assesses continuity and change in notions of identity and forms of practice among Bon medical practitioners as they react to the forces of modernity in post-Imperial China.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1875-2152
Print ISSN
1875-2160
Pages
pp. 353-379
Launched on MUSE
2013-12-14
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.