Abstract

This article explores the pragmatics of prototypically religious prophet-praise formulas as used in everyday interactional settings in Jordan. Analysis of naturally occurring data shows that formulas of this type serve various pragmatic functions—place-holding during hesitations, seeking protection from envy, marking success, and intensifying the basic message of the utterance. Imperative and interrogative versions are used to terminate a disruptive activity or to elicit involvement and agreement, and as a device for claiming the floor. The pragmatic deployment of these formulas shows the intertwining of language, culture, and religion in communicating meaning in Arabic.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1944-6527
Print ISSN
0003-5483
Pages
pp. 61-91
Launched on MUSE
2013-12-08
Open Access
No
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