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  • Contributors

Urs Boschung, M.D., has been professor and director of the Institute of the History of Medicine at the University of Bern (Switzerland) since 1985. His research focuses on eighteenth-century medicine (with emphasis on Albrecht von Haller) and various aspects of medical practice and patient history. His address is: Medizinhistorisches Institut, Buehlstrasse 26. Postfach, CH-3000 Bern 9, Switzerland (e-mail: urs.boschung@mhi.unibe.ch; URL: www.mhi.unibe.ch).

John C. Burnham is Research Professor of History, Professor of Psychiatry (by courtesy), and Scholar in Residence in the Medical Heritage Center at Ohio State University, 230 West 17th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (e-mail: burnham.2@osu.edu). His most recent book is How the Idea of Profession Changed the Writing of Medical History (Wellcome Institute for the History of Medicine, 1998).

Roger Cooter is a Professorial Fellow at the Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine at University College London, 24 Eversholt Street, London NW1 1AD, U.K. (e-mail: ucgarjc@ucl.ac.uk). The author of The Cultural Meaning of Popular Science (1984) and Surgery and Society in Peace and War (1993), he has also edited volumes on child health, war and medicine, accidents, alternative medicine, and, most recently, Medicine in the Twentieth Century (2003). He is currently working on a political history of medical ethics; a study of the militarization of medicine; and the relations between art, medicine, and modernity.

Bert Hansen is Associate Professor of History at Baruch College of The City University of New York, Box B5-260, 17 Lexington Avenue, New York, NY 10010 (e-mail: bert_hansen@baruch.cuny.edu). He earned the A.B. in chemistry from Columbia College and the Ph.D. in history of science from Princeton University. The subjects of his publications have included science and magic in the Middle Ages, obstetrics teaching and practice in the 1860s, homosexuality and medicine at the end of the nineteenth century, public health cartoons, medical breakthroughs in the mass media, the careers of gay and lesbian physicians, and the pictorial imagery of medicine in American popular culture in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

Rhodri Hayward is a Research Fellow at the Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine, University College London, 24 Eversholt Street, London NW1 1AD, U.K. (e-mail: rhodri.hayward@ucl.ac.uk). He has published on the history of prophecy, dream interpretation, electro-encephalography, popular psychology, and cybernetics. [End Page 270]

Valentin Huwiler studied dental medicine at the universities of Fribourg and Bern (Switzerland) and received his diploma as dentist and DDS in 2002 with a thesis on Theodor Kocher's surgical and clinical case presentations. At present, he works as a dentist in Grono and Bellinzona (Italian-speaking part of Switzerland). His address is: Al Monastero, CH-6702 Claro, Switzerland (e-mail: valentin.huwiler@gmx.ch).

Oliver Isepponi studied at the Universities of Fribourg and Bern (Switzerland) and received his DDS degree at Bern with a thesis on Theodor Kocher's surgical and clinical case presentations. At present he is working as a dentist in Sins near Lucerne. His address is: Heulediweg 6, CH-6414 Oberarth, Switzerland (e-mail: oisepponi@bluewin.ch).

Kenton Kroker is Assistant Professor of Science and Technology Studies, Atkinson Faculty, York University, 4700 Keele Street, Toronto, Ontario, M3J 1P3 Canada (e-mail: kkroker@yorku.ca). He is interested in the practices and technologies of biomedical research, and has published on the history of allergy, electroencephalography, and relaxation therapy. His first book, The Sleep of Others: Rapid Eye Movement and the Creation of Modern Sleep Research, is forthcoming from the University of Toronto Press. He is currently working on a book-length history of epidemic encephalitis.

Ellen Silbergeld is Professor of Environmental Health Sciences, Epidemiology, and Health Policy and Management at the Bloomberg School of Public Health, The Johns Hopkins University, 615 North Wolfe Street, Room W4108A, Baltimore, MD 21205 (e-mail: esilberg@jshph.edu). She is trained in environmental engineering and toxicology, and has conducted research on lead poisoning for over 30 years at Johns Hopkins and the National Institutes of Health, publishing most recently in the Journal of the American Medical Association on the role of lead...

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