Abstract

The World’s Columbian Exposition of 1893—with exhibits and participants streaming in from across the globe and 25 million visitors marveling at its palaces, pavilions, and foreign villages—is understood as a formative moment in Chicago’s history. Less well documented, however, is the fair’s significance for Jews, notably those living half a world away in Paris, Tetouan, Jaffa, and Smyrna. Yet they too were present. Their exhibits of crafts, art, and student accomplishments were on display in the largest of the fair’s structures, the Manufactures and Liberal Arts building, thanks to an unprecedented global constellation of philanthropists, luminaries, teachers, and students.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1527-2028
Print ISSN
0021-6704
Pages
pp. 53-69
Launched on MUSE
2013-10-27
Open Access
No
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