Abstract

Around 1906, Peirce discovered that the logical analysis of a proposition comes to an end when a “continuous predicate” is found. Continuous predicates are those predicates that cannot be analyzed, or, which is the same, are only analyzable into parts all homogeneous with the whole. This paper examines Peirce’s concept of continuous predicate and its relevance to his theory of logical analysis.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1558-9587
Print ISSN
0009-1774
Pages
pp. 178-202
Launched on MUSE
2013-10-18
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.