Abstract

This article examines three shipboard periodicals from nineteenth-century admiralty-funded polar expeditions and argues that through these texts, explorers—from able seamen to admirals—validated the English presence in the Arctic as effectively as the imposition of English names on the polar map. Officially sanctioned by the admiralty, however, these publications also performed a more subtle, but no less important, function: while submissions were anonymous and open to all members of the crew, material was carefully vetted by officer-editors, and, in delivering to their readers a carefully constructed cheerfulness, the papers helped maintain shipboard discipline by placing even sailors' leisure activities—writing and reading—under admiralty control.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1712-526X
Print ISSN
0709-4698
Pages
pp. 343-367
Launched on MUSE
2013-10-03
Open Access
No
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