Abstract

In Samuel Richardson’s Clarissa, the eponymous heroine speaks from the dead. Her posthumous texts transcend the strictures of linear time and signal her commitment to a traditional Christian conception of temporality. By delineating that commitment, and by analyzing her posthumous texts in light of anthropological studies of material culture, this essay demonstrates that Clarissa remains dedicated to reforming the present world even after she enters divine eternity. The essay revises previous evaluations of Clarissa’s death that claim she is silenced in the grave. Ultimately, Clarissa reveals itself to be less hostile to the material world than is commonly assumed.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1522-9270
Print ISSN
0039-3657
Pages
pp. 601-621
Launched on MUSE
2013-08-26
Open Access
No
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