Abstract

Critics predominantly read Daniel Defoe’s A Tour thro’ the Whole Island of Great Britain (1724–26) as a work promoting a vision of Britain as an economic power. They also treat the Tour’s narrator as Defoe himself, or, at least, as a figure with the same beliefs as Defoe. In this article, I prove that the narrator of the Tour is not Defoe but a fictional persona, a staunch supporter of the Church of England. I also demonstrate that the work is not just an encomium of British commerce but a sophisticated argument for religious toleration.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1522-9270
Print ISSN
0039-3657
Pages
pp. 565-582
Launched on MUSE
2013-08-26
Open Access
No
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