Abstract

This article examines the racial identities of second generation Korean and Indian Americans living in Dallas, Texas, relative to both Whites and Blacks, in order to elucidate their racialization. Korean and Indian Americans criticized White racism yet asserted that they were equal "Americans" to Whites, who did not deserve to be targeted. They accomplished this by differentiating themselves from Blacks whom they regarded, ironically, as the true foreigners. Why only a quarter of interviewees felt tied to Blacks is explained. Differences between the ethnic groups also receive attention, as do the influences of class and geography on racial identities.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1096-8598
Print ISSN
1097-2129
Pages
pp. 117-147
Launched on MUSE
2004-02-03
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.