Abstract

The comic scenes in the two principal editions of Christopher Marlowe's Doctor Faustus disrupt the tragic progression within the play's overarching linguistic drama. Lower-level, semiotic, comic outbursts of verbal assertion in both quartos batter against upper-level, symbolic, classical-Christian language, and, by the end of act IV (B-text), transform and merge. The semiotic energies of the comic eruptions persist in act V (both editions), within which they become vehicles of religious retribution, but where they also redefine emotional attachment, stimulate serial metamorphosis, and, in Faustus's final utterance (and implicit in the final chorus), join semiotic to symbolic expression.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1522-9270
Print ISSN
0039-3657
Pages
pp. 401-419
Launched on MUSE
2013-06-18
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.