Abstract

Public apologies of former perpetrators for their wrongdoing are commonly taken to be an expression of respect for victims. Public apologies are said to involve recognition that the victim deserves redress in the form of an acknowledgment of the wrong done to him or her. This paper seeks to qualify this view by focusing on the case of the public exposure of informers for the infamous secret police or Stasi under the German Democratic Republic. It argues that public apologies may in fact be a way of circumventing the possibility of promoting respect for victims.

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Additional Information

ISSN
2164-8646
Print ISSN
0149-7952
Pages
pp. 327-345
Launched on MUSE
2013-06-03
Open Access
No
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