Abstract

This article examines British working-class women's autobiography as a form of political dissidence. Crucial to guildswomen's collective autobiographical practice was writing about the reproductive body within the socio/historical context of class and gender relations from the perspective of women. As revealed in Maternity: Letters from Working Women (1915) and in Life as We Have Known It (1931), guildswomen's life writing contested boundaries between political and domestic spheres, shifted emphasis from the individual to a collective identity, and demanded the inclusion of reproductive rights within the domain of human rights.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1529-1456
Print ISSN
0162-4962
Pages
pp. 583-606
Launched on MUSE
2004-01-08
Open Access
No
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