Abstract

A traditional Mayan village in the state of Yucatan has an unusually high number of deaf inhabitants (13 of about 400). The deaf people have a rich sign language, which is not the same sign language as that of the deaf inhabitants of the towns and cities of Mexico. The deaf villagers are almost fully integrated into the ordinary patterns of life, and appear to have access to the economic benefits of the society; deafness is relatively depoliticized. This pattern is explained by the fact that all hearing villagers are able to communicate well in sign language.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1533-6263
Print ISSN
0302-1475
Pages
pp. 461-474
Launched on MUSE
2013-10-02
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.