Abstract

Two otherwise diverse films, Jin-Roh: The Wolf Brigade (1999), a Japanese anime reflection on an apocalyptic past and present intended for adults, and Hoodwinked! (2005), a child-friendly film featuring Little Red Riding Hood and her grandmother as cookie capitalists, share thematic connections to ATU 333 and crime and an animated format. Both also narrate different characters’ stories about criminal acts, invoking Kurosawa’s Rashômon (1950). This comparison fosters exploration of storytelling modes connecting fairy-tale, filmic, and legal discourses; how fairy-tale narrative contexts, performances, narrations, and texts relate to criminal justice rhetorics; and objectivist and postmodern viewpoints on narrative and truth.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1536-1802
Print ISSN
1521-4281
Pages
pp. 89-108
Launched on MUSE
2013-04-14
Open Access
No
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