Abstract

This article examines the institutional accomplishments and intellectual influence of Satti Majid, a Sudanese Muslim missionary who was active in Muslim American affairs from World War I until 1929. It recovers the pivotal role played by Majid in establishing Islam as an organized American religion during the 1920s. In this decade, Majid established a number of Muslim social welfare societies, attempted to create one of the first national Sunni Muslim umbrella groups in the United States, and achieved noteworthy success in converting American-born blacks to Islam. His most important follower, Daoud Ahmed Faisal, went on to become the premier Sunni Muslim religious leader of New York in the postwar period.

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Additional Information

ISSN
2165-5413
Print ISSN
2165-5405
Pages
pp. 194-209
Launched on MUSE
2013-04-04
Open Access
No
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