Abstract

Moral injury, the experience of having acted (or consented to others acting) incommensurably with one’s most deeply held moral conceptions, is increasingly recognized by the mental health disciplines to be associated with postcombat traumatic stress. In this essay I argue that moral injury is an important and useful clinical construct but that the phenomenon of moral injury beckons beyond the structural constraints of contemporary psychology toward something like moral theology. This something, embodied in specific communal practices, can rescue moral injury from the medical model and the means–end logic of techne and can allow for truthful, contextualized narration of and healing from morally fragmenting combat experiences.

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Additional Information

ISSN
2326-2176
Print ISSN
1540-7942
Pages
pp. 57-74
Launched on MUSE
2013-02-08
Open Access
No
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