Abstract

This essay suggests that to understand the pacifist position Woolf takes in her critique of fascism and patriarchy, it is essential to recognize how, not only why, she explores the relationship between narrative and political authority. Creating an intersection between a feminist conceptualization of Woolf's narrative technique and philosophical notions about ethical forms of representation, it argues that Woolf fragments the locus of narrative authority in Three Guineas to model a stylistic resistance to linguistic practices she thinks support totalitarian ideology.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1527-2001
Print ISSN
0887-5367
Pages
pp. 236-257
Launched on MUSE
2003-12-11
Open Access
No
Archive Status
Archived 2009
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