Abstract

This essay explores how early approaches in feminist aesthetics drew on concepts honed in the field of feminist legal theory, especially conceptions of oppression and equality. I argue that by importing these feminist legal concepts, many early feminist accounts of how art is political depended largely on a distinctly liberal version of politics. I offer a critique of liberal feminist aesthetics, indicating ways recent work in the field also turns toward critical feminist aesthetics as an alternative.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1527-2001
Print ISSN
0887-5367
Pages
pp. 214-235
Launched on MUSE
2003-12-11
Open Access
No
Archive Status
Archived 2009
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