Abstract

Throughout her writings, Françoise de Graffigny explores the material and emotional pressures facing women who, like herself, confront the challenges of financial and social instability. In her plays Cénie (1750) and La Fille d'Aristide (1758), Graffigny blends the potent sentimentality of the popular new comédie-larmoyante with a troubling critique of the opportunities for female economic survival in eighteenth-century France. Like Rameau's nephew, tramp philosophers such as Zilia and Cénie bring added complexity to Enlightenment conceptions of who and what makes a philosophe.

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Additional Information

ISSN
2166-5486
Print ISSN
1077-825x
Pages
pp. 3-15
Launched on MUSE
2016-04-06
Open Access
No
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