Abstract

This article examines the career of James Gillis, California’s state librarian from 1899 to 1917. It reviews the role politics played in library staffing prior to Gillis’s appointment and considers the extent to which Gillis filled his own staff with patronage hires. It then discusses why and how Gillis ended the state library’s spoils system and professionalized operations. While duly crediting Gillis’s importance as a library administrator, this article highlights the role California’s Progressive movement played in the state library’s modernization.

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Additional Information

ISSN
2166-3033
Print ISSN
2164-8034
Pages
pp. 68-90
Launched on MUSE
2013-01-30
Open Access
No
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