Abstract

This essay examines the influence of Situationist thought on aesthetics in postwar Britain through a close analysis of Throbbing Gristle, a fine-arts-cum-pop group responsible for the invention of the dystopian subculture Industrial Culture. Framing the group's work as a response to the politics of 1970s Social Art, the article argues that Throbbing Gristle's techno-libertarian aesthetics represent a deliberate effort to foreground and maintain deep-seated contradictions within the concept of the art of everyday life. By emphasizing the aesthetic side of Situationist thought, the article also offers a new framework for understanding and interrogating the legacy of the Situationists after 1968.

Additional Information

ISSN
1053-1920
Launched on MUSE
2012-01-03
Open Access
No
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