Abstract

This article offers a broad sketch of claims regarding the university's public purpose in the 1960s while noting that a vision of the university as an autonomous forum for moral debate cut across the seemingly insurmountable divide between young radicals and their liberal elders. Read through the lens of educational philosophies, the era's clashes did not simply pit liberal advocates of political neutrality against radical exponents of political commitment. Rather, many radical activists—and some liberals—believed that the university should cut off many of its ties to the wider society to gain a more critical purchase on it. Indeed, critics of Clark Kerr's bureaucratic "multiversity" often hewed to a surprisingly traditional conception of higher education.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1527-8034
Print ISSN
0145-5532
Pages
pp. 551-581
Launched on MUSE
2012-12-22
Open Access
No
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