Abstract

This essay argues that Ishmael's implausible narration in Moby-Dick (with its evident concealments, inventions, and fantasies) results from his status as a traumatized survivor and that through his incoherence, the novel insists that accounts of trauma cannot be subjected to the totalizing schemata of narrative aesthetics or therapeutic teleology.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1925-5683
Print ISSN
0027-1276
Pages
pp. 137-153
Launched on MUSE
2012-12-16
Open Access
No
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