Abstract

Just as Dracula represents the fantasized origin of the bohemian, Sherlock Holmes is this figure's fantastic end. The meeting of Holmes and Dracula within the cultural world of the late nineteenth century provides us with a telling reevaluation of the struggles that were played out through the conception of the bohemian from the 1830s on to the final decades of that century and the beginning of the next. As the fate of modern civilization is put at risk in the careers of these characters, their meeting suggests that the definitively marginal figure of the bohemian is central to the history of modernity.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1080-6547
Print ISSN
0013-8304
Pages
pp. 537-567
Launched on MUSE
2012-08-29
Open Access
No
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